Bookmark Kaumudi Online  Bookmark this site  Editor@Kaumudi  |  Marketing  Print Advt rates  |  Calendar 2012        Go!    
 
 
January 19, Friday 2018 8:48 PM       

       HEADLINES: Why we need these MPs to talk only in channels, asks K Surendran                                              B Sandhya removed as ADGP, South                                              Was son killed over property dispute? Police unwilling to accept Jaya's statement                                              CBI will probe Sreejiv’s death, order passed                                              Actress attack case: No action on Dileep’s complaint on charge sheet leak                                              Fire breaks out in Mumbai's Navrang Studio                                              Solution to SC judges’ row likely on Monday                                              EC has never touched this low: AAP                                              Hafiz Saeed should be prosecuted: US                                              India should not comment on Chinese construction in Doklam: Beijing                                              Pak-Iran to resume rail services                                              Kulbhushan Jadhav abducted from Iran: Baloch activist                                              ICC U-19 WC: India thrash Zimbabwe to top Group B                                              We will definitely try to get Ashwin back in CSK: Dhoni                                              AIFF U-16 team departs for exposure trip to Dubai                                              Kaumudi Facebook
       SCI&TECH Next Article: Ransomware threat: Centre activates mechanism to prevent ‘Wannacry’ cyber attack  
       'Manned missions to Moon, Mars may face medical emergencies'
 
         Posted on :18:38:51 Jun 5, 2017
   
A A
       Last edited on:18:38:51 Jun 5, 2017
         Tags: 'Manned missions to Moon, Mars, face medical
 
GENEVA: Astronauts on missions to deep space such as Mars may face severe medical emergencies like heart attacks, say experts who suggest that the crew must prepare to deal with potentially fatal illnesses or injuries.
 
Experts at the Euroanaesthesia congress in Geneva discussed the unusual and challenging problem of how to perform emergency medical procedures during space missions.
 
"Space exploration missions to the Moon and Mars are planned in the coming years. During these long duration flights, the estimated risk of severe medical and surgical events, as well as the risk of loss of crew life are significant," said Matthieu Komorowski, from the Charing Cross Hospital in the UK.
 
In the event of a crew member suffering from an illness or injury, they may have to be treated by personnel with little formal medical training and without the equipment that would be available in a comparable situation on Earth.
 
"In the worst-case scenario, non-medical personnel may have to care for an injured or ill crewmember. Far from low Earth orbit, real-time telemedicine will not be available and the crew will need to be self-reliant," Komorowski said.
 
"Duplication of skills will be critical to enhance crew safety, especially if the doctor on board himself becomes ill, injured, incapacitated or dies. As such, extending basic medical training to most crewmembers will be extremely important," he said.
 
In remote environments, medical and surgical conditions with a low probability of success that also require using vast quantities of consumables are often not attempted.
 
Similarly, during future space exploration missions, the crew must prepare for non-survivable illnesses or injuries that will exceed their limited treatment capability, researchers said.
 
Some of the solutions proposed by Komorowski include matching crew members for blood type to enable blood transfusions or making use of 3D printing of medical equipment rather than carrying items that would most likely not be needed during the mission.
 
In the event of a serious problem such as a cardiac arrest, it may be necessary to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) - an especially difficult procedure to perform in microgravity.
 
"Since astronauts are selected carefully, are usually young, and are intensively observed before and during their training, relevant medical problems are, fortunately, rare in space," said Jochen Hinkelbein from the University Hospital of Cologne in Germany.
 
"However, in the context of future long-term missions, for example to Mars, with durations of several years, the risk for severe medical problems is significantly higher," Hinkelbein said.
 
"Therefore, there is also a substantial risk for a cardiac arrest in space requiring CPR," he said.
The space environment presents a number of unique problems that must be overcome in order to deliver emergency medical care.
 
In microgravity it is not possible to use one's body weight to perform actions such as CPR as would be done on Earth, and there are strict limits on the amount of medical equipment and consumables that can be taken on a mission.
 
Hinkelbein outlined different methods of CPR that have been tested in microgravity experiments onboard aircraft and in specialised underwater space simulators.
A A
       SCI&TECH
Next Article: Ransomware threat: Centre activates mechanism to prevent ‘Wannacry’ cyber attack
 
 
SCI&TECH HEADLINES
Secret of longevity protein revealed!  
Absence of this gene can give men deadly cancer  
Soon, you can demote group admins on WhatsApp  
Regular yoga can slow down ageing of brain: Study  
What are haemorrhoids (piles) and what causes them?  
WhatsApp facilitates quick switch from voice to video call  
The Thin and Light Lenovo Ideapad 720s shines at Digit Zero 1 Awards  
Frequent heartburns up cancer risk in older adults  
Blueberry vinegar can help fight dementia  
iPhones with older batteries will take a hit in performance: Apple  
Eighth planet found in faraway solar system, matching ours  
Google brings a host of new features on Pixel 2  
Scientists turn beer into suitable petrol  
Space gives a sense of humbleness: NASA astronaut  
Researchers discover genes to prolong human life  
Google announces best apps of 2017  
This technology can help to reduce accidents on icy roads  
Yepzon launches in India; promises smart safety solutions  
Soon, you'll be able to control diabetes with your phone  
Turning bacteria into 'world's smallest tape recorders'  
How breastmilk protects babies from food allergy decoded  
Stars among the oldest in our galaxy discovered  
Apple delays release of smart speaker - HomePod  
Owning a dog may add years to your life  
'Textisms' actually add meaning to written words  
 
Do you think even today police resort to third degree torture to prove crime?
yes
 
no
 
no opinion
 
 
 
Home Kerala India World Business Sports Sci&Tech Education Automobile CityNews Movies Environment Letters 
© Copyright keralakaumudi Online 2011  |  Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited.
Head Office Address: Kaumudi Buildings, Pettah P.O, Trivandrum - 695024, India.
Online queries talk to Deepu Sasidharan, + 91 98472 38959 or Email deepu[at]kaumudi.com
Customer Service -Advertisement Disclaimer Statement   |  Copyright Policy